SF Olympians Festival VII – The Servants

SF Olympians Festival VII – Harvest of Mysteries
Staged Readings of 3 one-acts on one evening of the festival

@ the Exit Main Stage

October 14, 2016 – The Servants
ASCALAPHUS, by Elizabeth Flannagan
CHARON, by Bridgette Dutta Portman
MACARIA, by Marissa Skudlarek

San Francisco Olympians Festival, is a multi-discipline, nationally and internationally recognized new works theater festival based at the EXIT Theatre in San Francisco.  Each night of the festival consists of the staged reading of either a full-length play or a series of shorts, inspired by the mythical gods and heroes of Ancient Greece.

In Tattle Tale or Seasonal Allergies, ASCALAPHUS has been described as spiteful and treacherous, but hasn’t he suffered enough? At least Persephone is getting crowned queen at the End of the Season Ball at Camp Hades; an exclusive resort voted “Hottest Place to Winter” by Underworld magazine. The entire vacationing community sees Ascalaphus as a snitch, a lackey, but from his perspective, all he did was tell the truth. From Persephone’s perspective he didn’t have to tell at all. Now, she’s stuck with a distrustful boyfriend and a neighbor that she’s sure is still spying on her. Persephone is determined to find out why he told and after years of vacationing next to each other Ascalaphus might finally be ready to tell another truth.

In Bridgette Dutta Portman’s play, CHARON is a morgue director at a hospital, grim, no-nonsense, and inured to death. When a young woman comes to him claiming to be dead and requesting a spot in the morgue, Charon turns her away, believing her to be insane. Doctors in the hospital’s psychiatric ward diagnose the young woman with Cotard Delusion, or Walking Corpse Syndrome, a rare disorder in which a person becomes convinced that he or she is dead. But as the girl continues to insist that she belongs in the morgue, Charon begins to wonder whether there may be more to her bizarre claims, and finds himself grappling with his own buried past.

MACARIA, Marissa Skudlarek says, “…is the story of what happens when, after much begging from his daughter, Hades agrees to let Macaria join Persephone on her annual visit to Earth. It’s a play about mothers and daughters, about coming of age, about seizing the day; a life-affirming play about the princess of death.”

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